Pump Gas Rules at LOTO!

First, the shootout format (for those who are unaware): Enter the one mile course at 40 mph. At the drop of a green flag, accelerate as fast as possible to the highest speed you can reach by the radar gun one mile away. Sounds simple.

Hats off to Canadian, William Tomlinson, and his 6,000 hp 50 ft Mystic turbine powered catamaran – with the Lake of the Ozarks Shootout top speed of 208 mph! Whew!!! William wins the patience contest, too, with two very clean runs…that did not trip the radar guns. That had to be frustrating. Chip Romer performed flawlessly in his 388 Skater at 191 mph. Nice driving!

Port 1350 engine in Bob’s pleasure 48 MTI.
Bob Bull’s 48 MTI exits at 175 mph. Top gun – if there were a class for pump gas!

However, the pump gas shootout was between American, Bob Bull, and Norwegian, Tor Staubo. Both ran 48 MTI cats (Bob had two at the event!) with twin 1350 hp Mercury Racing turbocharged engines. And both came fully armed with professionals along side: Bob carried Randy Scism, owner of MTI. Tor enlisted another world champion, Johny Tomlinson, for the sticks. Read more

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Who Knows What Evil Lurks…?

Skater logo adorns a 1350 front cover: a gift for Pete’s nice purchase.

Skater soon will. This monster 1350 – lurking in the darkened, after-hours hallway of Racing’s dyno lab – is one of the second “official” pair going Pete’s way this week.

Evil 1350 lurking outside a dyno cell at Mercury Racing: Silver and Dandy Candy 1350 with dyno blessing!

Peter Hleden’s technicians have successfully completed Mercury Racing training and are now T.E.A.M. (Total Engine Application Management) accredited to install 1100 and 1350 packages at the Skater factory in Douglas, Michigan. Two prior Skaters have been rigged at a T.E.A.M. accredited dealer for two of Pete’s enthusiastic customers.

Menacing in carbon and Devil Red, this 1350 and its evil twin are in route to Douglas, MI.

A pair of “Devil Red” and carbon fiber 1350 rockets left Racing for Douglas earlier this week. Next and just off the dyno is this interesting first-time color combination of “Super Silver” and “Dandy Candy Red” 1350’s. This somewhat unusual color pairing will complement a spectacular Skater catamaran paint scheme. I can’t wait to see it – and the look on the new owner’s face when he feels the incredible torque!

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Walleye Prop

Mercury Racing Lab Finished Bravo I Outboard Propeller.
Mercury Racing Pro Finish Bravo I XS outboard propeller.

You may wonder how we go about testing props. We have a number of our own outboard and sterndrive boats that we use for initial testing. Nevertheless, I’m a firm believer of getting feedback from those who use the product everyday in the real world. Recently, I wanted feedback on performance differences between our Lab Finished Bravo I and Pro Finish Bravo I XS outboard props. My target applications were Walleye and bass anglers.

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Prop School – Part 4: Blade Cup

Illustration of cup added to the trailing edge of a typical thru-hub exhaust prop.
Blade cup location on our Lab Finished Maximus prop.

Cup is a curl formed or cast into the trailing edge of a propeller blade.  When done correctly, The face of a cupped prop blade is completely concave. Cupping is most beneficial on blades which are surfacing, either from transom height (X-dimension) or trim angle. The cup retains water on the blade for a longer period of time, enhancing thrust and efficiency. Racers and performance boaters were the first to realize the benefits of cupping. Now, most recreational props come standard with some cup.

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Prop School – Part 3: Blade Rake

Rake is the relationship of the blade face and the propeller hub.

Rake is the angle of a propeller blade face relative to its hub. If the blade face is perpendicular to the hub, the prop has zero-degree rake. As a blade face slants back toward the rear of the prop, blade rake increases. Rake is either flat (straight) or curved (progressive). Most lower horsepower (“lower” by Mercury Racing’s reckoning) outboard propellers, like Black Max aluminum and Vengeance, have 15-degree rake and are designed to operate fully submerged to push a boat across the water. Typically, higher horsepower outboard and sterndrive propellers have a higher flat or progressive rake.

A good view of our CNC cleaver prop on a NXT1 drive.

A greater rake angle generally improves the ability of the propeller to operate in a ventilating situation. Ventilation occurs when blades break and re-enter the water’s surface — such as occurs with 1) a Bravo sterndrive installed with a high “X” dimension, 2) a surfacing drive (NXT1NXT6 SSM or M8) or 3) an outboard installed or jacked high on a transom. In surfacing operation, higher rake can hold the water better as it’s being thrown into the air — deflecting it aft and creating more thrust. Read more

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