Accessories
Outboard FAQs
General FAQ's
Warranty FAQ's
OptiMax FAQ's
Fuel & Fuel System FAQ's
Electrical FAQ's
Winterization FAQ's
Parts FAQ's
General FAQ's

Where can I purchase Mercury Racing branded patches, decals, clothing or other merchandise?

Mercury offers a complete line of branded merchandise, and it's all available in the Mercury DockStore.

Top of Page

Please explain EPA restrictions on engine modifications, or gearcase changes.

EPA regulations prohibit changes to engines that could affect emissions limits. Per the service manual, "The dealer and/or consumer is not to modify the engine in any manner that would alter the horsepower or allow emission levels to exceed their predetermined factory specifications." The only changes permitted are gearcase/gear ratio changes for high altitude operation as detailed in applicable Mercury Marine Service Manuals. For availability of these Service Manuals, visit the Mercury Dockstore.

Top of Page

Can I use aftermarket "fins" to help my boat get on plane faster?

Using a product often referred to as a stabilizer fin is a modification of the gearcase that may change the manner in which the boat operates on the water. With the unit trimmed fully down (in or under), a reduction of the time necessary to get a boat on plane may result. However, some V-bottom boats using a stabilizer fin may exhibit a tendency to roll over far to one side as soon as planning occurs. The direction and degree of the roll will be dictated by prop rotation, weight distribution, and degree of trim under. The boat roll can cause passengers to be ejected. Trimming up or out can reduce or eliminate the roll. Because it is not possible to know how a given boat will respond to the use of such a product without thorough testing, Mercury does not recommend such products be used or not used. Also, use of these products may cause or contribute to the failure of the anti-ventilation plate on the gearcase. Failures caused, or contributed to, by modification are not covered by the limited warranty.

Top of Page

Can you provide contact information on old outboard motors?

The Antique Outboard Motor Club can provide information for collectors, restorers and people who want to determine the value of old outboards. The club has chapters throughout the U.S. and Canada. Information is available on-line at http://www.aomci.org.

Top of Page

Why does my boat perform differently on a hot day verses a cool evening?

It is a known fact that weather conditions exert a profound effect on power output of internal combustion engines. Therefore, established horsepower ratings refer to the power that the engine will produce at its rated rpm under a specific combination of weather conditions.

Corporations internationally have settled on adoption of I.S.O. (International Standards Organization) engine test standards, as set forth in I.S.O. 3046 standardizing the computation of horsepower from data obtained on the dynamometer, correcting all values to the power that the engine will produce at sea level, at 30% relative humidity at 70 deg.F (20 deg.C) temperature and a barometric pressure of 29.61 inches of mercury.

Summer Conditions of high temperature, low barometric pressure and high humidity all combine to reduce the engine power. This, in turn, is reflected in decreased boat speeds--as much as 2 or 3 miles-per-hour (3 or 5 Km per-hour) in some cases. Nothing will regain this speed for the boater, but the coming of cool, dry weather.

In pointing out the practical consequences of weather effects, an engine--running on a hot, humid summer day--may encounter a loss of as much as 14% of the horsepower it would produce on a dry, brisk spring or fall day. The horsepower, that any internal combustion engine produces, depends upon the density of the air that it consumes and, in turn, this density is dependent upon the temperature of the air, its barometric pressure and water vapor (or humidity) content.

Accompanying this weather-inspired loss of power is a second but more subtle loss. At rigging time in early spring, the engine was equipped with a propeller that allowed the engine to turn within its recommended rpm range at full throttle. With the coming of the summer weather and the consequent drop in available horsepower, this propeller will, in effect, become too large. Consequently, the engine operates at less than its recommended rpm.

Due to the horsepower/rpm characteristics of an engine, this will result in further loss of horsepower at the propeller with another decrease in boat speed. This secondary loss, however, can be regained by switching to a smaller pitch propeller that allows the engine to again run at recommended rpm.

For boaters to realize optimum engine performance under changing weather conditions, it is essential that the engine have the proper propeller to allow it to operate at or near the top end of the recommended maximum rpm range at wide-open-throttle with a normal boat load.

Not only does this allow the engine to develop full power, but equally important is the fact that the engine also will be operating in an rpm range that discourages damaging detonation. This, of course, enhances overall reliability and durability of the engine.

Top of Page

What other things besides atmospheric conditions will affect my boat performance?

WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION

Proper positioning of the weight inside the boat (persons and gear) has a significant effect on the boat's performance, for example:

  • Shifting weight to the rear (stern)
    • Generally increases top speed.
    • If in excess, can cause the boat to porpoise.
    • Can make the bow bounce excessively in choppy water.
    • Will increase the danger of the following - wave splashing into the boat when coming off plane.
  • Shifting weight to the front (bow)
    • Improves ease of planning off.
    • Generally improves rough water ride.
    • If excessive, can make the boat veer left and right (bow steer).
BOTTOM

For maximum speed, a boat bottom should be nearly a flat plane where it contacts the water and particularly straight and smooth in fore-and-aft direction.

  • Hook: Exists when bottom is concave in fore-and-aft direction when viewed from the side. When boat is planning, 'hook' causes more lift on bottom near transom and allows bow to drop, thus greatly increasing wetted surface and reducing boat speed. 'Hook' frequently is caused by supporting boat too far ahead of transom while hauling on a trailer or during storage.
  • Rocker: The reverse of hook and much less common. 'Rocker' exists if bottom is convex in fore-and-aft direction when viewed from the side, and boat has strong tendency to porpoise.
  • Surface Roughness: Moss, barnacles, etc., on boat or corrosion of outboard's gear housing increase skin friction and cause speed loss. Clean surfaces when necessary.
WATER ABSORPTION

It is imperative that all through hull fasteners be coated with a quality marine sealer at time of installation. Water intrusion into the transom core and/or inner hull will result in additional boat weight (reduced boat performance), hull decay and eventual structural failure.

CAVITATION

Cavitation is caused by water vapor bubbles forming either from a sharp edge or angle on the gear case or from an irregularity in the propeller blade itself. These vapor bubbles flow back and collapse when striking the surface of the propeller blade resulting in the erosion of the propeller blade surface. If allowed to continue, eventual blade failure (breakage) will occur.

Top of Page

What precautions should I take when trailering my outboard powered boat with the engine attached?

Trailer your boat with the outboard tilted down (vertical operating position). Shift the outboard to forward gear. This prevents the propeller from spinning freely. If additional ground clearance is required, the outboard should be tilted up using an accessory outboard support device. Refer to your local dealer for recommendations. Additional clearance may be required for railroad crossings, driveways and trailer bouncing.

IMPORTANT: Do not rely on the power trim/tilt system or tilt support lever to maintain proper ground clearance for trailering. The outboard tilt support lever is not intended to support the outboard for trailering.

Top of Page

What precautions should I take when operating my engine in freezing temperatures?

When using your outboard or having your outboard moored in freezing or near freezing temperature, keep the outboard tilted down at all times so the gear case is submerged. This prevents trapped water in gear case from freezing and causing possible damage to the water pump and/or other components.

If there is a chance of ice forming on the water, the outboard should be removed and drained completely of water. If ice should form at the water level inside the outboard drive shaft housing, it will block water flow to the engine causing possible damage.

Top of Page

What precautions should I take when operating my engine in Salt Water or Polluted Water?

We recommend that you flush the internal water passages of your outboard with freshwater after each use in salt or polluted water. This will prevent a buildup of deposits from clogging the water passages.

Refer to "Flushing The Cooling System" procedure in the Maintenance Section or your Operations and Maintenance Manual supplied with your engine.

If you keep your boat moored in the water, always tilt the outboard so the gear case is completely out of the water (except in freezing temperature) when not in use.

Wash down the outboard exterior and flush out the exhaust outlet of the propeller and gear case with freshwater after each use. Each month, spray Mercury Precision Lubricants or Quicksilver Marine Lubricants Corrosion Guard on external metal surfaces (DO NOT spray on corrosion control anodes as this will reduce the effectiveness of the anodes).

Top of Page

OptiMax FAQ's

What is the proper break-in procedure for an OptiMax outboard?

Break-in is important to insure correct engine performance and life. Follow the procedure listed in the Operation, Maintenance and Warranty Manual. Generally, for the first two hours we recommend avoiding extended periods of idle or wide-open throttle, or holding the engine at one speed for extended periods of time. New two-stroke engines require additional oil during break-in; OptiMax engines use programming inside the computer to increase the oil mixture during the specified break-in period.

Break-in procedures are described in the Operation, Maintenance and Warranty Manual supplied with each engine. Use the Bookshelf link on the Mercury Dockstore page if you need to place an order for a replacement manual.

Top of Page

Do I have to use a SmartCraft Monitor with my OptiMax engine?

No, however the operator will be at a disadvantage without a display, the only warning information available will be the horn, and the operator may not be able to identify what caused the warning system to activate. An overview of the warning system follows: The SmartCraft warning system incorporates the display screen, the warning horn and the Guardian Protection system. The warning horn is located inside the remote control or is part of the ignition key switch wiring harness.

Alarms Warnings - When a problem is detected, the warning horn sounds and the name of the offending alarm appears on the display.

  • If problem can cause immediate engine damage - the horn will sound continuously and the Engine Guardian System will respond to the problem by limiting engine power. Immediately reduce throttle speed to idle and refer to the warning messages on the monitor and descriptions in the Operation, Maintenance and Warranty Manual to tell you what to do about it.
  • If problem will not cause immediate engine damage - The horn will sound but not continuously.

Refer to the warning messages on the monitor and descriptions in the Operation, Maintenance and Warranty Manual to tell you what to do about it. Use the Bookshelf link on the Dockstore page if you need to place an order for a replacement manual.

Engine Guardian System - Monitors the critical sensors on the engine for any early indications of problems. The system will respond to a problem by reducing engine power in order to maintain a safe operating condition. The monitor display screen will show the percent of power available.

Top of Page

How do I connect the older style gauges to the new OptiMax engines?

Your dealer has detailed service information available for connecting to the analog style gauges. Due to the technical nature of the conversion, we highly recommend having a technician trained on OptiMax products perform the work.

Top of Page

What is the correct battery for my OptiMax?

1000 Marine Cranking Amps (MCA) or 750 Cold Cranking AMPS (CCA)

Top of Page

Fuel & Fuel System FAQ's

What is the proper break-in procedure for 2-cycle, 4-cycle, and OptiMax outboards?

Break-in is important to ensure correct engine performance and life. Follow the procedure listed in the Operation, Maintenance and Warranty Manual.

Generally, for the first two hours, we recommend avoiding extended idling, sustained periods of wide open throttle, or holding the engine at one speed for extended periods of time. New two-stroke engines require additional oil, either through the addition of oil with the fuel or programming inside the computer. Four- stroke models DO NOT require additional oil added with the fuel during break-in.

Break-in procedures are described in the Operation, Maintenance and Warranty Manual supplied with each engine. Use the Bookshelf link on the Mercury Dockstore page if you need to place an order for a replacement manual.

My engine keeps stalling at idle, and I find the primer bulb soft. Why? Several basic items should be checked. First, is the fuel tank full of fuel and vent open? Second, is the fuel line pinched from a heavy object sitting on the line, or is a tight connection restricting flow? Are there cracks in the line or connections, allowing air to leak into the fuel system? Finally, due to the changes in fuel composition, have your dealer inspect the fuel pump check valves for cupping and replace the primer bulb with the latest style.

Top of Page

What octane rating should the gasoline that I use in my motor have?

United States and Canada

Use a major brand of automotive unleaded gasoline with a minimum-posted octane rating of 87. Leaded gasoline is not recommended.

Performance Products will have different requirements, consult your Operation, Maintenance and Warranty Manual. Use the Bookshelf link on the Mercury Dockstore page if you need to place an order for a replacement manual.

Top of Page

What can be done to maintain fuel quality during periods of storage?

Mercury Marine recommends the use of a fuel stabilizer to prevent fresh fuel from undergoing degradation and oxidation during fuel storage. Mercury offers Marine Fuel System Treatment and Stabilizer both under the Mercury Precision Parts or Quicksilver brands. Additional benefits of the product includes: easier engine starting after periods of storage, elimination of the necessity to drain and dispose of fuel, prevention of the formation of deposits that could clog filters and tiny passages in the fuel system; and elimination of corrosion and rust throughout the fuel system. It absorbs water and prevents fuel line freeze-ups.

Top of Page

How can I lower the possibility of water trapped inside the fuel system being drawn into the engine?

The first issue is to prevent the water from entering the system. The second is to determine how much is in the system; if over a quart, you cannot effectively eliminate the possibility without draining the tanks.

If the amount is small, Mercury offers Marine Dri-fuel both under the Mercury Precision Parts or Quicksilver brands. Dri-fuel and Marine Fuel System Treatment and Stabilizer are designed to absorb water, allowing it to pass through the engine.

If water continues to accumulate and create problems then contact your local dealer for other alternatives.

Top of Page

How do I connect my kicker motor to the boat's main fuel tank?

First you must determine if both engines require the same type of fuel supply. Generally all four-cycle and larger two-cycle (oil injected) outboard engines require straight gasoline. Smaller two-stroke outboards may require a gas/oil mixture and will experience engine damage if operated on the straight gasoline used with larger engines. In these applications, two separate fuel tanks are required, one for straight gasoline and one for the gas/oil mix.

The preferred method available when both engines require the same type of fuel is to use a fuel tank with dual pick-ups, one for the main engine and one for the kicker engine. Both engines will have separate fuel hoses and primer bulbs.

Top of Page

What alternative/equivalent 2-cycle oils are available when I can't purchase Mercury Marine Precision Lubricants or Quicksilver brands of oil?

If Quicksilver or Mercury Precision Lubricants outboard oil is not available, substitute another brand of 2-cycle outboard oil by another engine manufacturer, making sure that is NMMA Certified TC-W3. The use of an inferior 2-cycle outboard oil can reduce engine durability. Damage from use of inferior oil may not be covered under the limited warranty.

Always consult your Operation, Maintenance and Warranty Manual for additional information. Use the Bookshelf link on the Mercury Dockstore page if you need to place an order for a replacement manual.

Top of Page

What alternative/equivalent 4-cycle oils are available when I can't purchase Mercury Marine Precision Lubricants or Quicksilver brands of oil?

If Quicksilver or Mercury Precision Lubricants 4-cycle outboard oil is not available, use a premium quality 4-cycle engine oil, certified to meet or exceed any one or a combination of the following American Petroleum Institute (API) Service Classification SH, SG, SF, CF-4, CE, CD, CDII.

Always consult your Operation, Maintenance and Warranty Manual for additional information concerning viscosity requirements and temperature ranges. Use the Bookshelf link on the Mercury Dockstore page if you need to place an order for a replacement manual.

Top of Page

What is the proper break-in procedure for 2-cycle, 4-cycle, and OptiMax outboards?

Break-in is important to insure correct engine performance and life. Follow the procedure listed in the Operation, Maintenance and Warranty Manual.

Generally, for the first two hours, we recommend avoiding extended periods of idle, sustained periods of wide open throttle and holding the engine at one speed for extended periods of time. New two-stroke engines require additional oil, either through the addition of oil with the fuel or programming inside the computer. Four stroke models: DO NOT require additional oil added with the fuel during break-in.

Break-in procedures are described in the Operation, Maintenance and Warranty Manual supplied with each engine. Use the Bookshelf link on the Mercury Dockstore page if you need to place an order for a replacement manual.

Top of Page

What type of fluid is used in my power trim system?

We recommend either Mercury Precision Parts or Quicksilver Power Trim and Steering Fluid. This fluid can be used in any of our power trim systems. Acceptable alternatives will depend upon the type and age of the system. If the fluid is yellow, use automotive engine oil -- the heavier weight oil will cause the trim system to react slower in cold water. If the fluid is red or clear in color, use Dextron III automotive transmission fluid.

Top of Page

Electrical FAQ's

Should my boat be rigged with a starting or a deep cycle battery, and why?

There is a difference between an ordinary starting battery and a Deep-Cycle battery. Starting requires a high amount of energy for a short period of time (about 30 seconds maximum). Only a small amount of the battery's capacity is used. Once the engine starts running, the battery is recharged quickly by the charging system.

A Deep-Cycle battery supplies a relatively low amount of current for a long duration. Deep-Cycle batteries, unlike starting batteries, can be run down and recharged repeatedly with minimum loss of capacity. Deep-Cycle batteries are designed to power electric fishing motors, and other electrical accessories in boats and recreational vehicles such as radios, TVs, fans, etc.

Since starting batteries and Deep-Cycle batteries are designed for different purposes, they are constructed differently inside. Starting batteries have porous active material. The plates are thin and are designed so the high-amp energy can be quickly delivered for maximum starting power. Repeated cycling, which involves lower capacity drains and recharges, weakens the positive plate. The active material drops from the grid, thus, in repeated deep discharge/recharge applications, the capacity of the starting battery drops below desired levels in about 50 cycles.

The Deep-Cycle battery has a denser active material and thicker plates to withstand deep discharge/re-charge service.

Top of Page

I'm seeing a small spark when I connect the battery cables. Is this ok?

Yes, newer engines require a small reference signal.

Top of Page

How do I charge two batteries with my outboard motor?

Using an outboard to charge two batteries is only effective if the outboard charging system is capable of delivering more than 15 to 20 amps. One point to remember: most systems are rated at wide-open throttle and charge substantially lower amounts at slower engine speeds.

Engines equipped with belt driven alternators and some smaller outboards can use a battery isolator to direct current to each battery. The isolator allows one battery to be discharged separately from the other and still allows both to charge from a single source.

Other options may be available, contact your local Mercury or Mariner Outboard dealer for additional information.

Top of Page

How do I hook up a tachometer or other gauge to my outboard motor?

Each Mercury Precision Part gauge contains instructions on how to connect the instrument. Our service manuals contain similar information and are available through a dealer or from the publications department at Mercury Marine. Use the Bookshelf link on the Mercury Dockstore page if you need to place an order for a service manual.

Top of Page

What do the warning horns indicate?

The warning horns vary model to model. Generally a solid tone indicates a problem that can cause immediate engine damage and the engine should be stopped. An intermittent tone indicates a problem that will not cause immediate damage but the operator should inspect the engine as soon as possible.

Refer to your Operation, Maintenance and Warranty Manual for detailed information concerning the warning systems for your engine. Use the Bookshelf link on the Mercury Dockstore page if you need to place an order for a replacement manual.

Top of Page

What is the correct battery for my outboard motor?

Battery Ratings Note: These are minimum engine specifications. Additional electrical loads from the boat will require larger batteries.

All Current Models
2.5L/3.0L 1000 Marine Cranking Amps (MCA) or 800 Cold Cranking AMPS (CCA)
105 amp hours

Top of Page

What are the general wiring colors used on Mercury Racing outboard engines?

Mercury Racing Standard Outboard Wiring Color Code
Color Where Used / Function
Black All Ground
Brown Reference Electrode MerCathode System
Orange Anode Electrode MerCathode System
Lt. Blue/White Stripe Trim UP Switch
Lt. Green/White Stripe Trim DOWN Switch
Brown/White Stripe Trim Sender to Trim Gauge
Purple/White Stripe Trim "Trailer" Switch
Gray Tachometer Signal
Black/Yellow Stripe Shorting or Stop Circuit
Pink Fuel Sender to Gauge
Red Unprotected Wire from Battery
Red/Purple Stripe Protected (Fused) Wire from Battery
Red/Purple Stripe Protected (12 Volt +) to Trim Panel Control
Purple Ignition (Switch) to 12 Volt Positive
Tan Temperature Switch to Warning Horn
Tan Temperature Sender to Temperature Gauge
Tan/Blue Stripe Temperature Switch to Warning Horn
Yellow Starter Solenoid to Starter Motor
Yellow Starter to Regulator (Charging Circuit)
Yellow/Red Stripe Start Switch to Start Solenoid to Neutral Start Switch
Yellow/Black Stripe Choke (Enrichener System)
Green with Color Stripe Switch Box to Coil - Striped and Numbered
White/Black Stripe Bias Circuit (Switch Boxes)

The ABYC Recommended Colors
Color Where Used / Function
Yellow/Red Starting Circuits
Brown/Yellow or Yellow Bilge Blowers
Dark Grey Navigation Lights & Tach Signals
Orange Accessory Feeds
Brown Pumps
Purple Instrument Feeds
Dark Blue Cabin and instrument Lights
Light Blue Oil Pressure
Tan Water Temperature
Pink Fuel Gauge Sender

Top of Page

Winterization FAQ's

Can I start my engine momentarily out of the water?

No. NEVER start or run your outboard without water circulating through the cooling water intake in the gear case. Cooling water prevents damage to the water pump (running dry) and overheating of the engine.

Top of Page

Where do I find maintenance and lubrication information for my engine?

The Owners and Operations Manual outlines the typical maintenance and lubrication items. If your manual is missing or damaged, please contact Mercury Marine Publications at (920) 929-5110 or order online through the Parts Express website.

Top of Page

What should I do to prepare my outboard engine for out-of-season storage or prolonged storage?

The major consideration in preparing your outboard for storage is to protect it from rust, corrosion, and damage caused by freezing water that may be trapped in the engine. We recommend taking your engine to an authorized Mercury or Mariner dealer to perform the work. Damage from improper storage procedures is not covered under the Mercury Marine limited warranty policy. If you chose to perform the storage procedure, follow the storage procedures outlined in your Operations, Maintenance & Warranty Manual.

Top of Page

Why is Storage Seal Rust Inhibitor not recommended in the newer EFI and OptiMax engines?

Storage Seal Rust Inhibitor uses a thick base designed to protect the internal engine surfaces. In some applications we have seen a build up of the thick base inside the injectors, causing the injectors to stick or operate incorrectly. On these models we recommend Quickleen and 2-cycle engine oil as a replacement for Storage Seal Rust Inhibitor. Quickleen is used to clean the injectors. The engine oil lubricates, as well as prevents rust from forming. We continue to recommend Fuel System Treatment and Stabilizer to help prevent the formation of varnish and/or gum in the gasoline. Always follow the storage procedures outlined in your Operation, Maintenance & Warranty Manual or Service Manual.

Top of Page

What should I look for when draining my gear lube?

Inspect gear lubricant for metal particles (lubricant will have a 'metal flake' appearance). Drain lube into a clean pan/container. The presence of fine metal particles (resembling powder) in the gear lube indicates normal wear. The presence of metal chips in the gear lube indicates the need for gear housing disassembly and component inspection by an authorized dealer.

Note color of gear lubricant when draining. If the color is white or cream it MAY indicate the presence of water in lubricant. Gear lubricant which has been drained from a gear case recently in operation will have a yellowish color due to lubricant agitation/aeration. Gear lube which is mixed with assembly lubricant (Special Lube 101 or 2-4-C w/Teflon) will also be creamy white in color. This is normal and should not be confused with the presence of water. If water is suspected to be present in the gearcase, a pressure check of the gearcase should be completed by an authorized dealer. Pouring a portion of the gear lubricant into a glass jar and allowing the lubricant to settle will allow any water in the lube to separate and settle to the bottom of the jar.

Presence of water in gear lubricant indicates the need for inspection by an authorized dealer. The dealer will disassemble the gear housing and inspect the oil seals, seal surfaces, O-rings, water pump gaskets, as well as the gear housing components for damage.

Top of Page

Can I leave my lower unit or sterndrive empty of lubricant over the winter?

We do not recommend leaving a lower unit or sterndrive empty during storage periods. An empty oil cavity may allow moisture to collect on the gears, bearings and shafts. Rust will form when the moisture reacts with the air, damaging the internal components.

Note: If water was present when draining the gear oil, the lower unit or sterndrive should be inspected by an authorized dealer.

Top of Page

What is the purpose of the Corrosion Control Anode?

Your outboard has control anodes at different locations. An anode helps protect the outboard against galvanic corrosion by sacrificing its metal to be slowly eroded away, instead of the outboard metals.

Each anode requires periodic inspection especially in saltwater applications, which will accelerate the erosion. To maintain this corrosion protection, always replace the anode before it is completely eroded. Never paint or apply a protective coating on the anode, as this will reduce its effectiveness.

Top of Page

How can I prevent the propeller from sticking onto the shaft?

We recommend a liberal coat of one of the following Mercury Precision or Quicksilver Marine Lubricants on the propeller shaft: Special Lubricant 101, 2-4-C Marine Lubricant with Teflon, or Anti-Corrosion Grease. These lubricants are available from any authorized Mercury Marine dealer.

Note: Always use the correct mounting hardware and torque the propeller nut to the correct specifications. Verify the propeller tightness after 20 hours of operation. DO NOT operate the boat with a loose propeller.

Top of Page

I accidentally reversed the battery connections when I reinstalled the battery. What potential damage could I have caused?

We strongly recommend that you have an authorized dealer inspect the vessel before returning it into service. The potential damage will vary from model to model. Although we try to design in protection for each component, limitations do exist.

The first item to check is the fuse or fuseable link. Most models have some type of protection in the circuits. You can replace the fuse with the correct size and test the system. If the fuse fails again, dealer involvement is recommended.

Other items on the engine that may be damaged include, but are not limited to the following: voltage regulators, rectifiers, tachometers, Electronic Control Module, isolation diodes and melted wiring. Boat related items may include the following: radios, radar, lights, wiring, etc.

Top of Page

My dealer is recommending that I shrink wrap my boat before storage, are there any items affecting my engine that I should be concerned about?

Shrink wrap is a very effective method of protecting the boat during periods of storage; however, it is very important to ventilate the hull. Even in the driest conditions, without ventilation, the plastic cover will trap moisture. This moisture can create rust on some metal components, corrosion on others and mold/mildew on the carpet and upholstery. Always follow the manufacture's recommendations for ventilation.

Top of Page

Parts FAQ's

Where can I buy genuine Mercury Precision Parts and how much do they cost?

Mercury Precision Parts are sold only through authorized dealerships. Consult the yellow pages to locate a local dealership or use the Dealer Locator on this web site for an extended search. The Parts Express button on this site will allow you to identify the parts required for your engine and connect you with an authorized dealer who can ship the parts directly to your location. An authorized dealer can provide you with the retail price of the parts.

Top of Page

Can consumers purchase parts, tools, or service manuals directly from Mercury?

Parts and tools are available only through authorized dealers. Find your nearest dealer by searching the Yellow Pages, calling 1-800-MERCURY, or right here at our Dealer Locator. Service Manuals, parts catalogs and owner's operation and maintenance manuals are available from Mercury by calling direct at 1-920-929-5110. Or order on-line at the Mercury Dockstore or through Parts Express. In either case, have your engine serial number available.

Top of Page